News
    2007

December 3, 2007: NY Daily News: "Company's software helps deaf people communicate with speaking world"

March 12, 2007: iCommunicator live at CSUN 2007

March 10, 2007: Tech-abling tools worth the wait

2006


September 17, 2006: Extreme Makeover: Home Edition features iCommunicator
August 31, 2006:iCommunicator supports "Opportunity for Success Ride"
June 5, 2006 - iCommunicator releases v5.0


2005

March 5, 2005 - iCommunicator bought by PPR

2004

May 19, 2004 - Most Innovation Solutions Awards 2004
iCommunicator provides emergency room accessibility for patients who are deaf at Upper Chesapeake Health.
Speech Technology Magazine

May 19, 2004 - ScanSoft and 1450, Inc. Win Speech Technology Magazineís Most Innovative Solution Award.

May 18, 2004 - ScanSoft and 1450, Inc. Win STMís Most Innovative Solution Award
iCommunicator recognized as an innovative advanced speech recognition technology to provide accessibility and empower persons with disabilities Speech Technology Magazine

January 09, 2004 - iCommunicator Helps Facilitate Communications with Deaf Patients at Maryland's Upper Chesapeake Health Facilities
iCommunicator Helps Facilitate Communications with Deaf Patients at Maryland's Upper Chesapeake Health Facilities
Microsoft Accessibility Web site

2003

September 22, 2003-High-Tech Invention Allows People Who Are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing to Freely Communicate with the Hearing World

October 14, 2003 - ScanSoft, Teltronics and 1450 Inc. Team to Enable Speech-based Accessibility Solutions for Individuals with Disabilities

October 14, 2003 - Academy Award-Winning Actress Marlee Matlin Joins Sen. Tom Harkin, Easter Seals and Microsoft via Video Relay Service for Capitol Hill Showcase Of Assistive Technology Innovations

July 15, 2003 - iCommunications Program Provides Multisensory Communications Solution to the Hearing Impaired
iCommunications Program Provides Multisensory Communications Solution to the Hearing Impaired
Speech Technology Magazine

March 01, 2003 - iCommunicator featured in eSchoolNews-online
eSN Special Feature: Assistive Technologies New technologies can help all students excel, regardless of physical challenges
eSchool News staff and wire service reports

November 07, 2002 - iCommunicator featured in the Wall Street Journal.com
Some Cutting-Edge Gadgets To Even the Playing Field
Stacey Forster - The Wall Street Journal Online

2002

October 24, 2002 - ScanSoft and Interactive Solutions Team on iCommunicator to Automatically Convert Speech into Sign Language
The Manatee maker of the iCommunicator hopes to reach new markets
Rich Shopes - Herald Tribune, Manatee County FL

October 16, 2002 - ScanSoft and Interactive Solutions Team on iCommunicator to Automatically Convert Speech into Sign Language
Teachers, Friends and Government Workers Can Have Virtually Seamless Communication with People Who are Hard of Hearing and Deaf
Scansoft Website

October 14, 2002 - Mass High Tech article
ScanSoft speaks to deaf community with new system
Patricia Resende - Mass High Tech

August 23, 2002 - Teltronics sells off subsidiary to focus on core business
Teltronics sells off subsidiary to focus on core business
Rich Shopes - Sarasota Herald-Tribune

August 22, 2002 - Teltronics Sells Stake in Unit - Sale frees up funds for ailing company Teltronics Sells Stake in Unit - Sale frees up funds for ailing company
Christopher Cole - Bradenton Herald

August 19, 2002 - Teltronics Announces Sale of Controlling Interest in Interactive Solutions, Inc. to MKR Group, LLC Partners

July 01, 2002 - The Microsoft Accessibility Website (1)
Perrigo case study, featuring best practices and lessons learned, as well as examples of why it makes good business sense to provide accessible technology in the workplace.
The Microsoft Accessibility Website

July 01, 2002 - The Microsoft Accessibility Website (2)
Wacker Siltronic case study, featuring best practices and lessons learned, as well as examples of why it makes good business sense to provide accessible technology in the workplace.
The Microsoft Accessibility Website

June 21, 2002 - Interactive Solutions, Inc. Receives 2002 Vendor Award from Florida Alliance for Assistive Technology(FAAST)

2001

November 12, 2001 - Flordia Department of Law Enforcement Customer Story Florida Department of Law Enforcement Customer Story

November 07, 2001 - Windows XP Most Accessible Version of Windows Operating System Ever Released
Windows XP Clears a New Bar in Accessibility; For the First Time in the History of Windows, Multiple Assistive Technologies Were Available at Launch

November 07, 2001 - Interactive Solutions' iCommunicator System Together With Windows XP Will Provide Higher Levels of Accessibility and Interoperability to Users

October 23, 2001 Ė iCommunicator improves understanding for employees iCommunicator improves understanding for employees

October 08, 2001 - Compaq Celebrates National Disability Employment Awareness Month With Company-wide Activities, Sponsorship

May 22, 2001 - New computer technology aids hearing-impaired students New computer technology aids hearing-impaired students

May 01, 2001 - Deaf crime fighter has secret weapon Expensive computer helps FDLE worker
Deaf crime fighter has secret weapon Expensive computer helps FDLE worker

2000

November 15, 2000 - Teltronics Appoints Gail Rosenberg Director Of Special Needs Education For Interactive Solutions



iCommunicator live at CSUN 2007
iCommunicator will be featured at the HP/Microsoft booth at CSUN on these dates/times:
Thursday, March 22:
9:00am - 1:00PM
Friday, March 23:
12:00pm - 2:00PM




iCommunicator partners with Extreme Makeover: Home Edition
Watch Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Sundays 8/7c on ABC

The fact that Vicente Llanes is blind doesnít stop him from reaching out to help others. The same is true for other members of his family, who also suffer from various disabilities.

The family has been selected by ABCís Emmy Award-winning reality television show, "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition," to have a new home built for them by Pinnacle Companies.

On May 4, 2006 the family received a "door knock" from the design team, the build commenced May 6 and finished at the "reveal" when they came home to their new house for the first time. The two-hour episode, a summer special aired September 17, 2006.

In addition to Vicente, who suffers from aniridia, a hereditary eye disease, the family includes his mother, Isabel, who is also blind; his wife Maria, who has thyroid cancer; his daughters Guenivir and Carrie, who are going blind; and his son, Zeb, who is deaf due to German measles contracted by his mother during pregnancy.


The Llanes Family

Before iCommunicator, Vicente could not have a direct conversation with his son. Zeb could use sign language, but Vicente could not see it. Similarly, Vicente could speak but Zeb could not hear it. They required a third party to interpret, usually Maria. Now with iCommunicator Vic's speech is converted into text and sign language that Zeb can see. In reverse, it converts Zeb's typing into speech, which his father can hear.

Vicente, who has a knack for computers, uses his skills to help the visually impaired throughout the world. He is a volunteer for Bookshare.org, a non-profit online resource that increases access to books and periodicals for the visually impaired by reproducing publications into specialized digital formats for the disabled.

In addition, he assembles computer units and troubleshoots them for a technology teaching school for the blind in the Philippines. He has also taught basic computer skills to blind and visually impaired students at Lighthouse International in Westchester, NY. Before they became widely available, he wrote his own computer programs for the blind.

His wife, Maria, who works as a physical therapist, uses her skills to help out friends and church members in need of physical therapy, despite having back trouble herself.

Their parentsí example hasnít been lost on the children. Daughter Guenivir, 19, has volunteered at a day care center and at church, where she has assisted in Sunday school, led a childrenís Bible study group, helped out at the nursery and visited seniors in a nursing home. She also takes notes for a deaf student at college.

Her ambition is to earn a masterís degree in special education and business administration and then open a business that would benefit children with special needs and disadvantages.

Similarly, Zeb, 16, who is deaf, can be counted on to help out friends and neighbors in any way he can. He mows lawns, shovels driveways, paints rooms and cleans up for friends or during construction and various projects at church.

Their new house will help the family by making it more friendly to the disabled. For instance, Vicente can only work on his Braille books for Bookshare now at night because he cannot concentrate due to the street noise during the day, but in the new house the noise will be muffled by special insulation. Because the blind substitute reliance on the sense of hearing for the loss of sight, they can be easily distracted by extraneous noise.

iCommunicator is proud to donate our patented softwareĒ, says Steve Bruner, iCommunicatorís Vice President, ďand help Zeb Llanes change his life for the better.Ē

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Teltronics Announces Sale of Controlling Interest In Interactive Solutions, Inc. to MKR Group, LLC Partners

August 19, 2002

Contact:
Gail Rosenberg
grosenberg@icommunicator.com
941.753.5000, ex 3303

Charles Messman/Todd Kehrli
MKR Group, LLC
212.308.4557/310.314.3800
cmessman@mkr-group.com
tkehrli@mkr-group.com

SARASOTA, Fla., Aug. 19 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Teltronics Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: TELT - News) today announced the successful completion of an agreement with the partners of MKR Group, LLC (MKR Group), whereby Teltronics has sold a 70% controlling interest in Interactive Solutions, Inc (ISI). Prior to the transaction, Teltronics owned 85% of ISI and will retain a 15% minority interest. The MKR Group is a financial services and consulting firm specializing in the growth and strategic development of technology companies. The financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

Enables Focus on Market-Leading Core Business

"In the current market environment, we think it's important to focus on our core business," said Ewen Cameron, Teltronics' president and CEO. "Today, our customers are small to large sized businesses and government agencies that use our switching systems and software as the backbone for their telecommunications networks. Although ISI's solutions for the deaf and disabled community present an attractive opportunity, the reality is that the vast majority of our business expertise is in the telecommunications market space. We believe that ISI, as a stand-alone company, will now be able to attract joint ventures with significant partner companies and further grow its business through these relationships, a prospect that was not achievable as a subsidiary of a publicly traded telecommunications company. Also, we believe that the MKR Group's experience in the technology and financial sector together with their belief in ISI's current management & product will provide ISI with the support needed to grow its business and obtain these relationships and will present a long term benefit for Teltronics as a minority shareholder."

About Teltronics:
Teltronics, Inc. is a leading global provider of communications solutions and services that help businesses excel. The Company manufactures telephone switching systems and software for small-to-large size businesses, government, and 911 public safety communications centers. Teltronics offers a full suite of Contact Center solutions -- software, services and support -- to help their clients satisfy customer interactions. Teltronics also provides remote maintenance hardware and software solutions to help large organizations and regional telephone companies effectively monitor and maintain their voice and data networks. The Company serves as an electronic contract-manufacturing partner to customers in the U.S. and overseas. Further information regarding Teltronics can be found at their web site, www.teltronics.com.

Interactive Solutions, Inc:
Interactive Solutions designs and markets technologically advanced, multimedia computer solutions for the education of hard-of-hearing, deaf and learning disabled people. The iCommunicator system is a revolutionary product that allows a deaf or hard-of-hearing person to comprehend spoken language, achieve two-way communications, improve reading skills, improve linguistics and learn both sign language and the English language.

The iCommunicator system has already seen success in schools, universities, government agencies and rehabilitation service centers throughout the United States. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates equal access to education, government facilities and medical and emergency services. The iCommunicator system is an important new technological advancement towards achieving that goal.

For further information visit the Company's website at http://www.isi-icomm.com or call 888/463-0474 or TDD/TTY 800/362-4584.

A number of statements contained in this press release are forward-looking statements that are made pursuant to the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties, including the timely development and market acceptance of products and technologies, competitive market conditions, successful integration of acquisitions, the ability to secure additional sources of financing, the ability to reduce operating expenses, the ability to maintain adequate liquidity, the ability to comply with the rules for inclusion in The Nasdaq Stock Market and other factors described in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The actual results that the Company achieves may differ materially from any forward-looking statements due to such risks and uncertainties.

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June 21, 2002 - Interactive Solutions, Inc. Receives 2002 Vendor Award from Florida Alliance for Assistive Technology (FAAST)

Interactive Solutions, Inc. received the 2002 Vendor Award from the Florida Alliance for Assistive Technology (FAAST) at the organizationís annual awards banquet on June 21, 2002 in Orlando, FL. Annually, FAAST presents a variety of awards in the field of assistive technology, but this was the first year the Vendor Award was presented. The award recognized ISI as a vendor of assistive services and technology that has shown innovation in the development, delivery and/or distribution of assistive services and technology. The Florida Alliance for Assistive Services and Technology (FAAST) is funded by the United States Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistive Technology Act of 1998 (ATA), U.S. Public Law 105-394, reauthorized the "Tech Act". FAAST began its existence in 1992 as a federally funded grant project and was housed with the Florida Department of Labor and Employment Security, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. FAAST was designed to develop and implement a consumer responsive, comprehensive, statewide system of technology-related assistance and systems change for individuals from birth to death. The mission of FAAST is to enhance the quality of life for all Floridians with disabilities by promoting access to, awareness of and advocacy for assistive technology.

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November 12, 2001 - Florida Department of Law Enforcement Customer Story
Flordia Department of Law Enforcement Customer Story


Summary:
At the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, revolutionary iCommunicator software running on a Compaq Armada E500 is helping hearing-impaired employee Abbey Drigot learn the job skills she needs to contribute to the agency and succeed in her career. Software helps the hearing-impaired learn, communicate at work and school

"As a deaf person, I'm always searching for ways to help me communicate and understand what is going on in meetings and training courses at work. My employer purchased iCommunicator software, and we're both seeing benefits." - Abbey Drigot, photography forensic technologist, Florida Department of Law Enforcement

Meet Abbey Drigot. Wisconsin native. New college grad. Independent. Ambitious. Fascinated by crime and the law. Photography buff. Deaf.

Hired as a photography forensic technologist at the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) last year, Abbey knew she had a lot to learn. It's why she jumped at the chance to attend a two-week training class about fingerprints.

Familiar questions about Abbey's participation in the class arose quickly. Could a sign language interpreter be located in time? Would the interpreter be able to convey all the details that Abbey needed to know? Was there budget for the interpreter? From elementary school through college, the answers to these same questions too often left Abbey reading lips, which experts say for most people is accurate only about 30 percent of the time.

FDLE wanted better for Abbey and the department. Co-workers took sign language classes. The department arranged for signing interpreters for scheduled meetings. Together, Abbey and the department investigated other options, knowing the agency would not provide an interpreter forever.

Abbey's Internet browsing paid off. She discovered iCommunicator software from Interactive Solutions Inc. in Sarasota, Fla. The company claimed its software could translate voice into text, and/or sign language and generate a computer voice from text. The solution seemed to fit the need Abbey had for her fingerprint training class and for everyday communications at work. A team from FDLE headed to Sarasota to check out the software and the company.

A week later, Abbey was in her training class using iCommunicator software on a new Compaq Armada E500 notebook computer. The outcome? Abbey understood the instructor. She asked questions in class. She answered questions from the instructor. She passed the course.

The hidden costs of hearing disabilities Abbey knows she's fortunate. She has a college education and a good job. But she knows she's paid a price for her deafness. "In college, I can't imagine how much I might have missed. I think interpreters are excellent, but sometimes instructors talk really fast and it's difficult for the interpreter to give me all the information I need."

Multiply those difficulties by a worldwide deaf population of 70 million and 400 million hard-of-hearing and the cost of deafness to society is clear, says Mike F. Dorety, president of Interactive Solutions. "In the past 120 years in the United States, the efforts on the part of educators to teach hearing-impaired people have been tremendous, but teachers really haven't had the tools they needed. What happens normally is that a child with severe or progressive hearing loss leaves our school system reading at no better than a fourth-grade level. Over the years, the schools have turned out millions of people who have very little chance to succeed."

How iCommunicator works The system combines off-the-shelf speech recognition software with iCommunicator custom software. The user speaks into a wireless microphone. First, that speech is translated into text the user sees on-screen. Second, in a screen window, the user sees video of a signing interpreter translating the speech into American Sign Language - without any language shortcuts.

"American Sign Language consists of only about 8,500 words, but as a society we use about 60,000 words," says Dorety. "Words for which there are no signs must be finger-spelled. American Sign Language was intended as a shortcut to keep the communication at a level that allows the interpreter to physically complete the task. With iCommunicator, the user sees every word signed in exact English order, so they get the message and learn language skills, grammar and composition the way it's taught to hearing students."

"The third thing the software does is the most exciting," Dorety says. "The text is transmitted into a computer-generated voice that can be plugged directly into a hearing aid or cochlear implant." That eliminates ambient crowd noise, laughter and other sounds. Some hearing-impaired people hear words distinctly for the first time. That new information can improve their ability to speak clearly.

The software can also save the text translation of speech for later display. That means a student can replay a lecture to help her study for an exam.

Dorety cautions that the software isn't for every deaf or hard-of-hearing person or useful in every situation. Nor is iCommunicator intended to replace signing interpreters. "We don't have enough interpreters as it is," he says. "In fact, we hope iCommunicator encourages more people to become signing interpreters."

Then there's the issue of "training" the underlying speech recognition software to recognize a person's voice. That's inescapable with current speech recognition technology. In Abbey's fingerprinting class, the instructor read into the system prior to the class so that Abbey would see his presentation translated correctly.

"I just listened to what the teacher said," Abbey says. "If I had questions or answers to his questions, I typed in what I wanted to say."

Compaq's commitment to accessibility "We've been in conversations with Compaq for about 18 months," says Dorety. "We did a lot of development work in hopes that Compaq would come to market with a notebook computer running at least a 700 MHz Pentium processor. They did. We found out that the Compaq product was extraordinary for its speed, accuracy and efficiency. As the speed goes up, our software runs much smoother and better, and the speaker training time goes down. We've continued to migrate with Compaq up the Pentium trail."

"Compaq has been a great supporter through the entire project. We need more companies like Compaq with the firepower domestically and internationally to get involved and help us create a solution."

Choosing Compaq was easy
The fact that iCommunicator software had been tested on Compaq hardware helped make the choice of hardware easy, says FDLE's Steve Balunan, a crime laboratory analyst responsible for training Abbey. "We weren't going to go out and buy the software and slap it on a computer if the developer hadn't tested and approved it. Reliability and ease of use are important to us."

So is productivity, and Balunan has high hopes for Abbey. "We hope iCommunicator will afford Abbey the same opportunities that everyone else has in terms of learning and career advancement. It wouldn't surprise me for Abbey to become one of the first non-hearing forensic experts in the country."

Note: The iCommunicator system is used in about 50 school districts across the U.S. Funding may be available through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, says Dorety. Corporate users should inquire about funds available through the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Business results:
Improved ability to benefit from the talents of deaf and hard-of-hearing employees as they learn and contribute more Greater productivity from deaf and hard-of-hearing employees More flexibility in communicating with deaf and hard-of-hearing employees

What makes it work:

iCommunicator software from Interactive Solutions Inc.
COMPAQ Armada E500 Pentium III
- Intel Pentium III 800MHz
- 192MB (100MHz) SDRAM
- 10GB Hard Drive
- 14.1" TFT Display
- 24X Max CD-ROM
- Mini-PCI v.90 modem / 10/100 NIC Combo Integrated
- Microsoft Windows 2000
- Microsoft Word 2000
- 3-year hardware warranty, parts & depot service

Spokesperson:
Steve Balunan
Crime Laboratory Analyst
Florida Department of Law Enforcement

Michael F. Dorety
President
Interactive Solutions Inc. (iCommunicator)
Sarasota, Fla.

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November 07, 2001 - Windows XP Most Accessible Version of Windows Operating System Ever Released

Windows XP Clears a New Bar in Accessibility; For the First Time in the History of Windows, Multiple Assistive Technologies Were Available at Launch


REDMOND, Wash. -- Nov. 7, 2001 -- As part of an ongoing commitment to make all its software products useable for everyone, Microsoft Corp. today announced that Microsoft Windows XP is the most accessible version of any Microsoft operating system to date. With its built-in accessibility features and compatibility with more than a dozen assistive technology products, the Windows XP operating system enhances accessibility for users with specific vision, hearing, mobility, cognitive and seizure-related disabilities. "Microsoft's goal in the development of Windows XP was to enable all users to experience more with their PC than they ever thought possible," said Chris Jones, vice president of the Windows Client Group at Microsoft. "The accessibility enhancements in Windows XP provide better integration with assistive technology and help our customers achieve more, communicate better and get help more easily."

In addition, accessibility enhancements in Windows XP allow customers with disabilities to be more productive and efficient by enabling them to more easily customize Windows XP based on their own accessibility needs and preferences. Accessibility utilities that come with Windows XP, such as Magnifier and Narrator, provide temporary accessibility support to individuals who need short-term use of a computer or need to set up their own computer for the first time.

Microsoft worked with the disability community to determine what accessibility improvements to make to Windows XP. Feedback was sought through focus groups, beta testing, executive feedback sessions and design reviews. Assistive technology users, assistive technology vendors and the Microsoft Accessibility Advisors, a cadre of professionals who have a unique understanding of the computing needs of people with disabilities, all played a role in determining what accessibility improvements to make.

"For more than 12 years, Microsoft has strived to make each of its products more accessible than its previous versions," said Gary Moulton, manager of assistive technology vendor relations at Microsoft. "Our goal is to be certain that each new product is easier for our customers to operate, with new and/or improved features that address specific needs, including those of our customers with disabilities. Feedback from our customers and assistive technology vendors is the cornerstone for us in achieving that goal."

"The American Council of the Blind (ACB) applauds the attention paid in Windows XP to accessibility for visually impaired persons," said Charles Crawford, executive director of the ACB and a Microsoft Accessibility Advisor. "The Windows XP operating system incorporates disability access to both the best of the past and the challenges of the future. It's the equal playing field upon which the contributions of both those who can see the screen and those who cannot can be harvested."

Microsoft takes into consideration government regulations, including section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, when developing products such as Windows XP. Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act requires federal agencies to consider accessibility before they purchase, procure and maintain new electronic and information technologies.

Like Windows XP, Office XP provides solutions to address customers' accessibility needs. Office XP applications include advanced speech-recognition functionality, enabling people to enter and edit data, control menus and execute commands by speaking into a microphone, and improve productivity by speaking to their PC. In addition, when used together, Office XP and Windows XP provide an exceptional desktop usability experience for customers using assistive technologies.

In the past, assistive technology users waited up to 18 months for assistive technology devices to support newly released operating systems. Assistive technology, also called accessibility aids, works with a computer's operating system to accommodate specific disabilities. In the development of Windows XP, Microsoft worked closely with Compaq Computer Corp. and many assistive technology vendors so that software such as screen readers, screen magnifiers, on-screen keyboards and hardware such as one-handed keyboards and augmentative communication devices addressed a wide range of disabilities and were available to users when Windows XP hit the shelves. Companies including Ai Squared, Dolphin Computer Access, Freedom Scientific Inc., GW Micro Inc., Interactive Solutions Inc., NXi Communications Inc. and Tash Inc. currently have, or soon will have, assistive technologies available that support Windows XP. Compaq also has Evo and Presario desktop and notebook computers with Windows XP readily available.

"Freedom Scientific and Microsoft worked together during the development phase of Windows XP to ensure that users who are blind or have low vision will have the necessary assistive technology that will seamlessly integrate with the new operating system," said Eric Damery, vice president of business development for software at Freedom Scientific Inc. "This includes our soon-to-be released Version 4.01 of JAWS for Windows screen reader and OPENBook 5.0 scanning and reading software. Our MAGic 8.0 magnification software will also be compatible with Windows XP in the near future. As we continue our relationship with Microsoft, we're confident that we are offering our customers the best accessibility solutions in the industry."

More information about assistive technologies can be found on the Microsoft Enable Web site at http://www.microsoft.com/enable/at/default.htm.

Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq "MSFT") is the worldwide leader in software, services and Internet technologies for personal and business computing. The company offers a wide range of products and services designed to empower people through great software -- any time, any place and on any device.

Microsoft and Windows are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corp. in the United States and/or other countries.

The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

Note to editors: If you are interested in viewing additional information on Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft Web page at http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/ on Microsoft's corporate information pages.

Assistive Technology Vendors

Support Windows XP Quote Sheet November 2001

"All our accessibility products feature CompatibilityOne, our commitment to support all Windows platforms in one package. Ai Squared and Microsoft have been working hard to ensure that low-vision users will have complete access to Windows XP. Our upcoming releases, ZoomText 7.1 and BigShot 2.03, will feature support for Windows XP, along with continuing support for all the other Windows operating systems."

-- Ben Weiss
President
Ai Squared

"Windows XP provides users with improved technology integration and richer communications. Supernova extends those benefits to blind and partially sighted computer users."

-- Mike Hill
Development Director
Dolphin Computer Access

"As a blind technology user, I am very pleased with the accessibility enhancements made to Windows XP. Windows XP, coupled with GW Micro's Window-Eyes Professional software, will offer people who are blind ultimate access to the Web, software applications and all aspects of computing. Now people who are blind will have access to the latest operating system from Microsoft and the latest screen reader technology from GW Micro at the same time."

-- Clarence Whaley
Director of Sales and Marketing
GW Micro

"Interactive Solutions' iCommunicator platform was originally developed on Windows 98 and has experienced a seamless migration with Windows 98, Windows 2000 Professional and Windows XP, thus offering users multisensory technologies that provide communication accessibility for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing and persons who face other communication challenges. Delivering Windows XP with iCommunicator software allows our disabled clientele greater speed and reliability when communicating in the home, classroom and workplace. Windows XP and its new accessibility features combined with the iCommunicator create 'Equality through Technology,' which is a very important advancement for all people with disabilities."

-- Michael F. Dorety
President
Interactive Solutions Inc.
(Subsidiary of Teltronics Inc., Nasdaq "TELT")

"Maintaining compatibility with all versions of Windows is a high priority for us so we can continue to deliver compelling products for individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing, and for those who need to communicate with people who are deaf. We are pleased that our existing software NexTalk and NTS work well with Windows XP."

-- Tom McLaughlin
President
NXi Communications Inc.

"Because of the accessibility features built into the Windows XP operating system, our customers can now modify the accessibility features of the USB WinMini, Tash's innovative one-handed keyboard, to accommodate their specific physical needs. In the past, any adjustment to the setup of our product was very complex. This makes the USB WinMini a true plug-and-play device."

-- Colin Wheeler
President
Tash Inc.

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Interactive Solutions' iCommunicator System Together With Windows XP Will Provide Higher Levels of Accessibility and Interoperability to Users

November 07, 2001

Contact:
Gail Rosenberg
grosenberg@icommunicator.com
941.753.5000, ex 3303

Charles Messman/Todd Kehrli
MKR Group, LLC
212.308.4557/310.314.3800
cmessman@mkr-group.com
tkehrli@mkr-group.com

SARASOTA, FL, Wednesday, November, 7, 2001--- Interactive Solutions, Inc. (ISI), a subsidiary of Teltronics, Inc., (TELT NASDAQ), today joined Microsoft Corp. (MSFT NASDAQ) in demonstrating its support of the Microsoft Windows XP operating system. In recognition of creating a computing experience that is usable to everyone, Interactive Solutions has created the iCommunicator software system that works with Windows XP to provide people with severe hearing and communication disabilities new, and exciting possibilities which enhance their experience in the home, school, and workplace.

"ISI and Microsoft have formed a strategic relationship to integrate our iCommunicator software with Windows XP to create equal access for many people with hearing and communication challenges," states Michael F. Dorety President of Interactive Solutions Inc.

Morgan Greene, Jr. relays, "I am an 18 year old deaf student in college. Windows XP boots up quickly and is very reliable which allows me to move from class to class without missing any part of the teacherís lecture. The system is very easy to navigate which is very important for people with disabilities."

ISI's iCommunicator system makes verbal communication possible between the hearing world and a person who is profoundly deaf, hard-of-hearing, or an individual with communication disabilities. This multi-sensory device improves comprehension of spoken language and teaches reading, speech skills, and sign language.

"Interactive Solutions and Microsoft worked together to ensure that assistive technology users would have the appropriate tools available to integrate with and take full advantage of Windows XP when it was released," said Gary Moulton, Assistive Technology Vendor Relations Manager at Microsoft. "With the iCommunicator system, Interactive Solutions is committed to delivering the best possible solutions to Windows XP users through advanced technology design and implementation."

For further information on the iCommunicator system and other accessibility functions available on Windows XP, please see the press release issued today by Microsoft at http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/todaynews.asp.

About Interactive Solutions:
Interactive Solutions, Inc., a subsidiary of Teltronics, Inc., designs and markets technologically advanced, multimedia computer solutions for the education of hard-of- hearing, deaf and learning disabled people. Teltronics' common stock trades on The Nasdaq SmallCap Market tier of The Nasdaq Stock Market under the symbol "TELT". Further information regarding Teltronics can be found at their web site, www.teltronics.com

A number of statements contained in this press release are forward-looking statements, which are made pursuant to the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties, including the timely development and market acceptance of products and technologies, competitive market conditions, successful integration of acquisitions, the ability to secure additional sources of financing, the ability to reduce operating expenses, the ability to maintain adequate liquidity, the ability to comply with the rules for inclusion in The Nasdaq Stock Market and other factors described in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The actual results that the Company achieves may differ materially from any forward-looking statements due to such risks and uncertainties

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October 23, 2001 - iCommunicator improves understanding for employees
iCommunicator improves understanding for employees


Communication for deaf employees and their coworkers at Wacker just got a lot easier. In early June, Wacker became the first major manufacturing company in the world to purchase an iCommunicator. The computer-like device translates spoken English into text, which appears on the screen. The text is also translated into sign language, displayed in a smaller screen window. Deaf employees can now type responses to others, which the system translates into a computer-generated voice. The iCommunicator, which looks like a souped-up laptop computer, is now being introduced in classrooms and government agencies across the country. The hardware includes a cordless headset-style microphone and a receiver attached to a high-end laptop. A processor with at least 700 MHz, 192 MB of RAM and a 10GB hard drive with at least 8-MB devoted to video memory is required to run the software.

Whereas communication with deaf employees in the past relied upon handwritten messages, e-mail and charades-style signing, as well as an interpreter in certain situations, employees are learning to work with the new system to incorporate the iCommunicator into their workday. At times, a noisy environment can make it difficult for the system to recognize what is said, which takes practice in enunciation and consistency of speech. But those employees who work with the machine are confident the iCommunicator will improve communication. Many of the Wacker employees played a role in bringing this new device to Wacker and see it as very positive that their industry is contributing to technology they can use themselves to solve special communication problems.

Due to Wacker's commitment to helping people with disabilities as evidenced by our use of the iCommunicator, we have been awarded the Employer of the Year Award. This award is given to a company by the Oregon Disabilities Commission for outstanding inclusion of people with disabilities in the work force. The Governor of Oregon, John Kitzhaber, presented the award on October 23, 2001 in Salem, Oregon and the Wacker Siltronic Corporation name will be placed on the Governor's Honor Roll.

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Compaq Celebrates National Disability Employment Awareness Month With Company-wide Activities, Sponsorship

October 08, 2001

Contact:
SOURCE: Compaq Computer Corporation

HOUSTON, Oct. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month in the U.S., and the Compaq Accessibility Program Office is gearing up to help employees, customers and students learn more about accessibility.
Not only is Compaq a national sponsor of Disability Employee Mentoring Day, but Compaq employees across the country are learning more about accessibility and mentoring students with disabilities. An estimated 54 million Americans live and work with a visual, hearing, mobility, speech or cognitive disability.

"Our employees take pride in the fact that Compaq has assumed a leading role in using technological innovation to make information and technology accessible to all people," said Michael Takemura, Compaq's director of the Office of Accessibility. "Compaq is committed to making accessible technology and information a priority-providing access anytime, anywhere, to anyone."

Compaq is holding a special event today -- Accessibility Awareness Day -- to emphasize the importance of using the power of technology to increase accessibility. Featured speakers include:

>   Yvonne Jackson, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Organization and Environment.

>   Gary Moulton, Product Manager of the Microsoft Accessible Technology Group. Earlier this year, Compaq announced it is working with Microsoft to improve the accessibility and interoperability of the companies' joint products.

>   Randy Marsden, President of Madentec, a manufacturer of products for hands-free computer access. Marsden is also Vice President of ATIA, the Assistive Technology Industry Association. Compaq is a member of ATIA, and Compaq's Takemura serves as a board member in the organization.

"I am thrilled to see Compaq put together this program for its employees to commemorate National Disability Employment Awareness Month," said Marsden. "This is the first time a computer hardware manufacturer has ever put together a program like this, and it is both a ground-breaking and industry-leading effort on behalf of Compaq to give American workers a better chance to learn about accessibility, and to put accessible practices into place."

A number of assistive technology vendors are demonstrating products on the Compaq Houston campus today, such as screen readers, screen magnifiers, alternative pointing devices and accessibility kiosks. These vendors include AiSquared (producers of ZoomText, a screen magnifier and reader), Freedom Scientific (producer of JAWS, a screen reader), Interactive Solutions, Inc. (manufacturer of iCommunicator, speech to text to sign language software), Madentec Limited (manufacturer of Tracker 2000, a head tracking device), Microsoft (improving the lives of people with disabilities by making computers a positive force in employment, education and recreation) and Quadmedia (a producer of accessible kiosks).

Compaq is committed to designing products, services, and programs with improved usability and accessibility for all customers. Compaq products with Microsoft Windows XP pre-installed or XP-ready are designed for accessibility. These products are tested with industry-leading Assistive Technology products to ensure equal access. More information about Microsoft's accessibility technology can be found at www.microsoft.com/enable/ .

"Economic empowerment is at the heart of disability rights," says Andrew J. Imparato, president and CEO of the American Association of People with Disabilities. "Millions of talented and qualified people with disabilities face unemployment. Until they gain access to meaningful career opportunities they cannot truly become full participating members of our society. Nor can they live the American dream. Disability Mentoring Day provides an excellent opportunity for students with disabilities to make connections that can provide a competitive edge about how to successfully join the workforce and contribute to our nation's economic growth. We are grateful for companies like Compaq -- one of our National Corporate Sponsors -- who are making Disability Mentoring Day a reality by hosting students at worksites across the country."

National Disability Mentoring Day

Wednesday, October 24, 2001 is National Disability Mentoring Day, and many Compaq sites will participate by mentoring local college students with disabilities. Students spend the day shadowing an assigned mentor, and mentors in all businesses and functions are needed to support this national effort. Students who would like more information about being matched with a Compaq employee should refer to accessibility@compaq.com.

Compaq Accessibility Background

In March, Compaq announced the creation of an Accessibility Program Office to address the computing needs of people with disabilities, a community that has grown to more than 750 million worldwide. The Program Office guides the integration of accessibility in Compaq product design, engineering, product development, documentation, information on Compaq websites, and services and support. Compaq uses technology to expand accessibility and enable all people to take full advantage of their experience, talents and skills. Customers can view the Compaq Accessibility Video at http://www.compaq.com/accessibility/downloads/accessibility.wmv

Company Background Founded in 1982, Compaq Computer Corporation ("Compaq") is a leading global provider of enterprise technology and solutions. Information on Compaq and its products and services is available at www.compaq.com
Compaq and the Compaq logo are trademarks of Compaq Information Technologies Group, L.P. This news release may contain forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be deemed forward-looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and assumptions include the possibility that the Hewlett-Packard/Compaq merger does not close or that the companies may be required to modify aspects of the transaction to achieve regulatory approval or that prior to the closing of the proposed merger, the businesses of the companies suffer due to uncertainty; the market for the sale of certain products and services may not develop as expected; that development of these products and services may not proceed as planned; that Compaq and Hewlett-Packard are unable to transition customers, successfully execute their integration strategies, or achieve planned synergies; other risks that are described from time to time in Compaq and Hewlett-Packard's Securities and Exchange Commission reports (including but not limited to Compaq's annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2000, HP's annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended October 31, 2000, and subsequently filed reports). If any of these risks or uncertainties materializes or any of these assumptions proves incorrect, Compaq's results could differ materially from Compaq's expectations in these statements. Compaq assumes no obligation and does not intend to update these forward-looking statements.
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May 22, 2001 - New computer technology aids hearing-impaired students
New computer technology aids hearing-impaired students


Summary: Created by Interactive Solutions Inc., a subsidiary of Teltronics, the iCommunicator system makes verbal communication possible between the hearing world and a person who is profoundly deaf, hard of hearing, or has special needs. "Most children hard of hearing leave our school systems after 12 years with a fourth-grade reading level," said Michael Dorety, president of Interactive Solutions. "We want to teach them to comprehend the spoken word and to read the written word effectively."

iCommunicator consists of a high-powered laptop with software, a connection to the studentís hearing assistance device (if the student has one), and a small wireless microphone worn by the teacher. The microphone transmits directly to the studentís laptop.

"To our knowledge, there is no product like it," said Dorety.

He said iCommunicator was conceived two years ago, when Dorety was approached by Virginia Greene and her then-16-year-old son, Morgan. Morgan is profoundly deaf and uses a hearing device called a cochlear implant.

Cochlear implants are surgically implanted devices that create an artificial sense of sound by sending electrical impulses into the auditory nerve. iCommunicator can be connected to work with this device or a more traditional hearing aid worn externally.

"We were asked to invent a product that allowed Morgan to communicate with the hearing world and not rely on a sign language interpreter," said Dorety. The problem with interpreters is that they are rare and can lead to dependency when deaf students rely on having them to communicate, he said.

"iCommunicator is not intended to replace sign language interpreters; itís intended to support the child when the interpreter is not there," said Dorety.

To use the iCommunicator, the teacher speaks into a small wireless microphone that transmits directly to the studentís laptop computer.

"The computer must be high-end 750 MHz or better because as you speak, your voice is converted to text and simultaneously converted to sign language," said Dorety.

When a teacher speaks a word, the student sees that word appear on the screen and simultaneously sees a video of an interpreter signing the same word. If a hearing-impaired child has a cochlear implant or wears a hearing aid, he or she also can hear the word pronounced.

"We take the teacherís voice and convert it to a computer-generated voice," said Dorety. "That computer-generated voice comes from the laptop and plugs directly into the studentís hearing aid or cochlear implant, eliminating all ambient noises."

Not being able to determine whether sounds picked up by cochlear implants or hearing aids are actually words rather than background noise is one limitation of those devices, he said. With iCommunicator, when students hear a word, they know the sound they are hearing is, in fact, a word.

"The question here is how to make [hearing aids and implants] more usable," said Dorety. "One of the [added benefits] of this technology is that the multisensory [elements] can allow for real comprehension."

If a student wants to communicate back, he can type a response and the computer pronounces the words. That speech then loops back to the child so he can hear how the computer pronounces the words and can break them down into syllables, learning how to pronounce the words himself.

According to company officials, iCommunicator is based on an open-architecture platform and is effective for most children who have a basic understanding of reading and sign language, even as young as 5.

Sue Potteiger teaches third grade to 9-year-old Hilary Sedgeman at Bell Shoals Baptist Academy (preK-8, enr. 500) near Tampa, Fla. Hilary is almost entirely deaf and uses two high-powered hearing aids. Her classmates can hear normally.

"From the time Hilary was two she loved to use my computer she really connected with it," said Martha Cook, Hilaryís mother. "But there was nothing out there that would work for school." Then last year Cook read about iCommunicator and purchased one of the systems for Hilary to use in second grade.

"She learned to use it and we took it to her private school and said, Here, we need you to use this," said Cook.

During class, Potteiger must pronounce her words precisely, like a television broadcaster, Cook said.

"The trainers came and trained my voice into the technology so that it can recognize my speech patterns," said Potteiger. "We also had a training session with the kids, where they could ask questions and understand that it is not a toy, but something that helps Hilary learn."

She estimates that the professional development involved took no more than six to eight hours in total.

"In class you have to enunciate your words and slow down your normal conversational speech," said Potteiger. "Beyond that, getting it plugged in and turned on every morning is really the biggest challenge. It is very user-friendly."

"Itís [an] instantaneous, close-captioned classroom," added Cook. "Hilary lip-reads, but with the iCommunicator the teacher can turn around and [Hilary] can still know whatís going on."

Dorety cautioned that the iCommunicator is not a "silver bullet" and may not be appropriate for every child. "If there is a message Iíd like to deliver, it is that educators need to assess both the product and the child for a match prior to purchasing this," he said.

For those who decide iCommunicator would be a boon for their hearing-impaired students, the cost can be prohibitive. The price for a single unit is $8,100, and Dorety said the majority of that cost is equipment-related.

"The computers we use today are 750 MHz to 850 MHz Pentium laptops, and they are very expensive," he said. "Six months from now the price may go down, but the system does run more efficiently with a higher processor."

The warranty, service, and software integration are all included, but an optional teacher training package is an additional $1,200 to $1,400.

"The training on the product is down to a couple of hours now," Dorety said. "We can establish very high voice-recognition accuracy by reading two short stories that take about an hour."

The company encourages schools to bring in eight to 10 teachers for the training session and implement a train the trainer system. Plans to offer training through the 150 New Horizons Learning Centers nationwide, as well as a web-based training option, are in the works.

To date, about 20 school districts and state and federal government agencies have placed orders for the iCommunicator system, Dorety said. Each organization is expected to purchase additional systems as funding is approved.

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May 01, 2001 - Deaf crime fighter has secret weapon: Expensive computer helps FDLE worker

Itís not unusual for businesses to supply their employees with computers. But it is unusual when the computer costs $8,000.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement recently purchased the computer to help Abbey Drigot take an 80-hour fingerprint analysis class.

Drigot, 23, is deaf.

"She can use this in classes and her daily interaction with co-workers," said Steve Ballunan, a fellow employee.

The computer converts speech into streams of data for simultaneous presentation of text, video sign language and computer-generated speech.

Drigot can type in questions, which will ask them in a womanís voice.

The system can be programmed to recognize up to 100 different voices.

Drigot is a forensic photographer who often spends hours working alone, taking pictures of fingerprints and other evidence.

Born deaf, the Wisconsin native is fiercely independent.

"It is something I donít even think about," Drigot said through co-worker Angela Leavens. "It is all I have known. It is part of who I am, but it doesnít make me special in any way."

Not wanting to stand out in a crowd, Drigot gets along fine in a hearing world.

She is appreciative of the effort people make when they try to communicate with her. She is used to the awkwardness some people have.

"My mother even has trouble communicating with me," she said.

Throughout her life she has been amazed at how many people want to learn how to talk with her through their own forms of sign language.

"When I was young, kids would want to learn sign language," Drigot said. "It was a fun way to meet people."

When she communicates with others at work and in public, she tries to read lips, but that is often impossible because of the wide variety of ways people speak.

Drigot went to high school at the Gallaudet School for the Deaf in Washington, D.C., with her twin sister, and later studied criminal justice at Jacksonville State University in Alabama.

Her supervisor, Forensics Chief Mike Rafferty, said Drigot was the best candidate when she was hired in August.

"No consideration or consolation was made just because she is deaf," Rafferty said. "She was the best candidate and it was an easy choice. Her being deaf was only a factor after she was hired."

Drigot wears a hearing aid, but it only offers minimal tones, which help her understand her surroundings.

The FDLE offered sign language classes to employees after she started working.

Leavens has become the most proficient.

"I donít know all of the signs, but I am getting better every day," she said. "We use lots of shortcuts when talking about work. And we have nicknames for everyone."

As much as her fellow employees have helped make her job easier through shortcuts and a custom-built computer chat room, Drigot is grateful the FDLE recently purchased a new computer system.

The iCommunicator system, from Interactive Solutions, is a laptop computer that can translate voice patterns into text or sign language on the computer screen.

The new computer system was first used April 30 when she started taking an 80-hour fingerprint analysis class.

Ballunan trained Drigot when she started and the pair were able to communicate fine.

"She learned better than any hearing person, because she is very focused," he said. "She has relied on learning from books so she actually comprehends things better than most.

"She has few of the distractions a hearing person has."

But he said for her to have an equal chance for advancement in more technical fields, the new computer system will be the key to her success.

"It has its bugs on complicated words, but in training classes and seminars, it will come in very handy," Ballunan said.

Drigot said she will work with the system but said she wonít rely on it.

"I am very independent," she said. "I donít want to be different from everyone else. Maybe the computer will help make me more independent."

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Teltronics Appoints Gail Rosenberg Director Of Special Needs Education For Interactive Solutions

November 15, 2000

Contact: Gail Rosenberg
grosenberg@icommunicator.com
941.753.5000, ex 3303

Charles Messman/Todd Kehrli
MKR Group, LLC
212.308.4557/310.314.3800
cmessman@mkr-group.com
tkehrli@mkr-group.com

SARASOTA, Fla. -- Teltronics, Inc. (Nasdaq: TELT) subsidiary, Interactive Solutions, Inc. (ISI), a leader in the development of assistive technology for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community, has appointed Gail Rosenberg as Director of Special Needs Education. In this position, Ms. Rosenberg will coordinate all efforts in training education for the iCommunicator system. The product, recently released by ISI, makes verbal communication possible between the hearing world and a person who is profoundly deaf, hard of hearing, or an individual with special needs. This multi-sensory device improves comprehension of spoken language and teaches reading, speech skills, and sign language.

Prior to joining Interactive Solutions, Inc., Ms. Rosenberg had a long career with the School Board of Sarasota County. As an Educational Audiologist, she was responsible for managing audiological services, countywide hearing screening programs, programs for students with hearing and vision impairments, and Floridaís improving classroom acoustics project. Ms. Rosenberg holds a Masters degree in Audiology from the University of South Florida, and is a member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the American Academy of Audiology. She is the current president of the Educational Audiology Association and a past president of the Florida Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists. Ms. Rosenberg is nationally known for her contributions in the areas of classroom acoustics and sound field amplification, central auditory processing disorders, and advocacy for accessibility for persons who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.

Michael Dorety, President of Interactive Solutions, Inc., stated "It is an honor to have Gail Rosenberg join the Interactive Solutions team. Her extensive background in the industry and hands on experience will add tremendous value to our effort of improving the quality of life for children and adults challenged by hearing loss and learning disabilities. I look forward to working with Gail in continuing to build Interactive Solutions into a leading technology provider for our special needs community."

According to Interactive Solutions, the iCommunicator system has already seen success in schools, universities, government agencies and rehabilitation service centers throughout the United States. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) mandate equality in the access to education, government facilities, and medical and emergency services. The iCommunicator system is an important new technological advancement towards achieving that goal.

For further information on the patent pending, iCommunicator system, visit the Companyís web site at http://www.teachthedeaf.com or call 888-463-0474 or TDD/TTY 800-362-4584.

About Teltronics Inc.

Teltronics, Inc. is dedicated to excellence in the design, development, and assembly of electronics equipment and software to enhance the performance of telecommunications networks. The Company manufactures telephone switching systems and software for small-to-large size businesses, government, and 911 public safety communications centers. Teltronics provides remote maintenance hardware and software solutions to help large organizations and regional telephone companies effectively monitor and maintain their telecommunications systems. The Company also serves as an electronic contract-manufacturing partner to customers in the U.S.

About Interactive Solutions:

Interactive Solutions, Inc., a subsidiary of Teltronics, Inc., designs and markets technologically advanced, multimedia computer solutions for the education of hard-of- hearing, deaf and learning disabled people. Teltronics' common stock trades on The Nasdaq SmallCap Market tier of The Nasdaq Stock Market under the symbol "TELT". Further information regarding Teltronics can be found at their web site, www.teltronics.com.

A number of statements contained in this press release are forward-looking statements, which are made pursuant to the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties, including the timely development and market acceptance of products and technologies, competitive market conditions, successful integration of acquisitions, the ability to secure additional sources of financing, the ability to reduce operating expenses, the ability to maintain adequate liquidity, the ability to comply with the rules for inclusion in The Nasdaq Stock Market and other factors described in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The actual results that the Company achieves may differ materially from any forward-looking statements due to such risks and uncertainties

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